[802.11] Standard

공부/Network 2012. 6. 29. 16:44 |

Standard and amendments

 

Within the IEEE 802.11 Working Group,[7] the following IEEE Standards Association Standard and Amendments exist:

 

 

 

  • IEEE 802.11-1997: The WLAN standard was originally 1 Mbit/s and 2 Mbit/s, 2.4 GHz RF and infrared [IR] standard (1997), all the others listed below are Amendments to this standard, except for Recommended Practices 802.11F and 802.11T.
  • IEEE 802.11a: 54 Mbit/s, 5 GHz standard (1999, shipping products in 2001)
  • IEEE 802.11b: Enhancements to 802.11 to support 5.5 and 11 Mbit/s (1999)
  • IEEE 802.11c: Bridge operation procedures; included in the IEEE 802.1D standard (2001)
  • IEEE 802.11d: International (country-to-country) roaming extensions (2001)
  • IEEE 802.11e: Enhancements: QoS, including packet bursting (2005)
  • IEEE 802.11FInter-Access Point Protocol (2003) Withdrawn February 2006
  • IEEE 802.11g: 54 Mbit/s, 2.4 GHz standard (backwards compatible with b) (2003)
  • IEEE 802.11h: Spectrum Managed 802.11a (5 GHz) for European compatibility (2004)
  • IEEE 802.11i: Enhanced security (2004)
  • IEEE 802.11j: Extensions for Japan (2004)
  • IEEE 802.11-2007: A new release of the standard that includes amendments a, b, d, e, g, h, i & j. (July 2007)
  • IEEE 802.11k: Radio resource measurement enhancements (2008)
  • IEEE 802.11n: Higher throughput improvements using MIMO (multiple input, multiple output antennas) (September 2009)
  • IEEE 802.11p: WAVE—Wireless Access for the Vehicular Environment (such as ambulances and passenger cars) (July 2010)
  • IEEE 802.11r: Fast BSS transition (FT) Working "Task Group r" (2008)
  • IEEE 802.11s: Mesh Networking, Extended Service Set (ESS) (~ June 2011)
  • IEEE 802.11T: Wireless Performance Prediction (WPP)—test methods and metrics Recommendation cancelled
  • IEEE 802.11u: Interworking with non-802 networks (for example, cellular) (~ Dec 2010)
  • IEEE 802.11v: Wireless network management (~ Dec 2010)
  • IEEE 802.11w: Protected Management Frames (September 2009)
  • IEEE 802.11y: 3650–3700 MHz Operation in the U.S. (2008)
  • IEEE 802.11z: Extensions to Direct Link Setup (DLS) (September 2010)
  • IEEE 802.11mb: Maintenance of the standard. Will become 802.11-2011. (~ Dec 2011)
  • IEEE 802.11aa: Robust streaming of Audio Video Transport Streams (~ Mar 2012)
  • IEEE 802.11ac: Very High Throughput <6 GHz;[20] potential improvements over 802.11n: better modulation scheme (expected ~10% throughput increase); wider channels (80 or even 160 MHz), multi user MIMO;[21] (~ Dec 2012)
  • IEEE 802.11ad: Very High Throughput 60 GHz (~ Dec 2012)
  • IEEE 802.11ae: QoS Management (~ Dec 2011)
  • IEEE 802.11af: TV Whitespace (~ Mar 2012)
  • IEEE 802.11ah: Sub 1Ghz (~ July 2013)
  • IEEE 802.11ai: Fast Initial Link Setup

To reduce confusion, no standard or task group was named 802.11l, 802.11o, 802.11x, 802.11ab, or 802.11ag.

802.11F and 802.11T are recommended practices rather than standards, and are capitalized as such.

802.11m is utilized standard maintenance, where 802.11ma completed 802.11-2007 and 802.11mb is expected to complete 802.11-2011.

 

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